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Government Enforcement Exposed - "The GEE"
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09 Mar 2015 “HELLO, NEWMAN” — GOVERNMENT CONTINUES TO LITIGATE REVERSED INSIDER TRADING CONVICTIONS

The U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, Preet Bharara, has decided not to go down without a fight. Following a Second Circuit panel’s reversal of Bharara’s signature achievement, the insider-trading convictions of former hedge fund managers Todd Newman and Anthony Chiasson, the U.S. Attorney’s office has petitioned the court for rehearing and rehearing en banc. The Securities and Exchange Commission has also weighed in on the U.S. Attorney’s side, arguing in an amicus brief that the panel seriously erred in its decision. Meanwhile, in other cases, particularly outside the Second Circuit, the Justice Department, and the SEC have argued strenuously that the Second Circuit’s panel decision should not be followed.   In the Second Circuit, the battle lines are being drawn. Bharara’s…

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23 Dec 2014 CRIMINAL INSIDER TRADING CONVICTIONS OVERTURNED IN FAR-REACHING RULING

In a stunning reversal that threatens Southern District of New York U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara’s signature achievement, the Second Circuit recently reversed the insider-trading convictions of former hedge fund managers Todd Newman and Anthony Chiasson. Over the last seven years, Bharara’s office has secured more than 80 convictions for insider trading. Many of those may now be imperiled by the appellate court’s decision, which appears to substantially raise the bar for what most be proved in an insider trading case.   Newman and Chiasson were “remote tippees,” individuals who allegedly received material inside information indirectly, and often several steps removed, from corporate insiders. Remote tippees were part of Mr. Bharara’s effort to aggressively push the envelope with respect to who might be liable for insider…

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15 Jul 2014 The Acquittal of Rengan Rajaratnum: A Precursor for Acquittals or No Action in Other “Remote Tippee” Cases?

The recent acquittal in the trial of Rengan Rajaratnum may be a harbinger of good tidings for future insider trading defendants. A key issue in some recent insider trading prosecutions, including this one, is whether the government is required to prove that the defendant/tippee (who received the tip) knew about the benefits provided to the tipper (who provided the tip). In a traditional insider trading case, this knowledge requirement is typically not difficult to prove because the defendant usually directly provided the insider with the benefit. But in some recent stock-tipping cases, prosecutors have pursued “remote tippees:” individuals that received a tip but have at least one layer between them and the insider.   The question of whether the knowledge requirement should be applied to…

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