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Government Enforcement Exposed - "The GEE"
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24 Jan 2017 The SEC’s Appointments Clause Dilemma

  The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has an Appointments Clause problem. Actually, it has two. Currently, the Commission’s ability to make decisions is limited in two ways: (1) as of last Friday, there are now only two sitting Commissioners, including no SEC Chairperson, rather than the full complement of five; and (2) a recent federal appellate court decision declaring the SEC’s process of hiring administrative law judges (ALJs) unconstitutional, thus casting doubt on the many activities those judges perform. Until these can be resolved, the agency’s ability to function generally, and in particular its ability to act as an enforcement agency, may be compromised.   The Appointments Clause of the Constitution states:   [The President] shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and…

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02 Sep 2016 D.C. Circuit Affirms Constitutionality of SEC’s In-House Tribunals

  The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit recently became the first appellate court to conclude that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) in-house administrative tribunals are constitutional and do not violate the Appointments Clause.   The constitutionality of the SEC’s in-house administrative courts has been questioned repeatedly since the Dodd-Frank Act dramatically expanded the kinds of cases the SEC could litigate on its home turf and the kinds of remedies it could obtain there, including against entities the SEC does not traditionally regulate. Since Dodd-Frank, the SEC has made no bones about its increased attraction to litigating cases in-house that it previously brought in federal district court. The SEC benefits from a shorter timeframe from initiating the action to its conclusion,…

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