Recent Posts
Follow Us
twittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube
The Legal Stuff
Government Enforcement Exposed - "The GEE"
0 1

22 Apr 2014 Here Comes Canada: Corruption Prosecutions Likely to Increase Under the Amended CFPOA

Discussions of anti-corruption and anti-bribery prevention and compliance often center on the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) and the U.K. Bribery Act, given the high-profile nature of those laws and the agencies that enforce them.  But companies would be wise to familiarize themselves with Canada’s Corruption of Public Officials Act (“CFPOA”) and the recent cases that have been brought thereunder, given that investigations under the recently amended CFPOA appear to be on the rise. The CFPOA was enacted in 1999 with Canada’s ratification of the OECD Convention.  However, there was virtually no enforcement of the CFPOA for the first 10 years of its existence, in part because the law contained major loopholes that prevented serious enforcement.  Among those loopholes was the inability of Canadian…

READ MORE
0 0

15 Apr 2014 Disgorgement in the Second Circuit: Equitable Relief or Punishment?

  In legal circles, disgorgement is known as an equitable remedy used to force a defendant to return money or property earned from illegal conduct.  Traditionally, disgorgement has not been used as punishment, but a recent Second Circuit decision has suggested that disgorgement may now be a punitive remedy in disguise.   In September 2005, Joseph Contorinis, an investment banker at Jefferies & Company, was given confidential information from a friend and fellow investment banker regarding a major financial acquisition.  Contorinis used the non-public information to make very profitable trades for a Jeffries’ fund that Contorinis managed and controlled.  By virtue of the information Contorinis had received and his subsequent trades, the fund earned a profit of $7,304,738, and avoided a loss of $5,345,700.  Most…

READ MORE
0 0

11 Apr 2014 Feds Issue Guidance for Banks Dealing with Marijuana-Related Businesses

  While marijuana dealing activities are not generally a topic of interest to those who are involved in the prosecution or defense of white collar criminal cases, financial institutions probably are well aware that dealing with persons involved in such activities can lead to prosecution of the financial institution. That is the “stuff” of interest to white collar criminal practitioners. With recent enactments in various states concerning medical marijuana and recreational use of marijuana, however, financial institutions have been scratching their heads about where the line is between permissible banking business and that which crosses the line.   In an effort to give clarity to that question, the Department of Treasury (Financial Crimes Enforcement Network) and the Department of Justice have issued memos providing guidance…

READ MORE
0 0

10 Apr 2014 INSURANCE AND WHITE COLLAR DEFENSE; IF YOU DON’T HAVE ONE, YOU MAY NOT BE ABLE TO HAVE THE OTHER

  The BUGA (“Big Ugly Government Agency”) has just metaphorically pounded on the door of your company, howling about civil and criminal charges, mind-blowing fines and penalties, debarment, seizing your first-born and otherwise threatening your existence. So you seek out a phenomenal white collar firm to defend you and yours and lo, they recommend a vigorous internal investigation, leading to the formation of a rock solid defense that, if needs be, can be deployed to defend against BUGA from here to the Supreme Court and back again.   It will, however, cost a lot of money to defend yourself. But, like many a modern company, you have insurance coverage that, you believe, will fund your defense.  Sadly, when you look to your insurance carrier, it…

READ MORE
0 0

09 Apr 2014 Alert: SEC creates team to examine private equity and hedge funds

  The SEC has created a dedicated team to examine and scrutinize private equity and hedge funds. According to Reuters, the SEC’s private fund team is led by Igor Rozenblit and Marc Wyatt, veterans of private equity and hedge funds respectively. The SEC’s private fund team will examine several areas in the private fund realm including asset valuation, fee structures and disclosures, and other communications with investors. Creation of this team follows the increased scrutiny on private funds that has occurred since passage of the 2010 Dodd-Frank law, which required many advisors to private funds to register with the SEC.  

READ MORE
0 0

01 Apr 2014 ILLINOIS SUPREME COURT FINDS EAVESDROPPING LAW UNCONSTITUTIONAL, BUT DON’T TELL ROSE MARY WOODS JUST YET

  The Illinois Supreme Court has concluded in two recent cases that Illinois’s long-standing prohibition against recording conversations unless all parties consent to the conversation is unconstitutionally overbroad. The Court determined that the statute prohibited recording conversations that could not possibly be deemed private and potentially applied to numerous situations, like recording public interactions with law enforcement or government officials, which arguably impinged on the public’s First Amendment rights. For a more detailed account of the Court’s rulings and its potential impact in the employment arena, see the recent client alert published by the Firm’s Labor & Employment law group.   Whether these decisions have any lasting impact, though, remains to be seen. The Court did not conclude that the notion of a two-party consent…

READ MORE
0 0

29 Mar 2014 Case to Watch – Chadbourne & Parke LLP v. Troice – Has the Supreme Court undermined the misappropriation theory of insider trading?

  In the recent decision by the United States Supreme Court, Chadbourne & Parke LLP v. Troice, the dissent suggested that the Supreme Court may have unwittingly undermined the misappropriation theory of insider trading liability. In that case, the Supreme Court, analyzing the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act of 1998, held that “[a] fraudulent misrepresentation or omission is not made ‘in connection with’” a security “unless it is material to a decision by one or more individuals (other than the fraudster) to buy or sell” the security. Under misappropriation theory, however, the fraudster’s omission plays no role in the decision by another individual to buy or sell a security. Consequently, Troice may vitiate misappropriation theory.   The opinion is available here.  

READ MORE
0 0

28 Mar 2014 Honest Services Fraud, Ray Nagin & “Big Easy” Money

Through appellate and trial court decisions in United States v. Ring[1] and United States v. Nagin[2], federal prosecutors have been given greater power to charge and obtain convictions for Honest Services Fraud.  They are not bound to prove the existence of either an explicit quid pro quo or the actual acceptance of bribes to achieve conviction.  Emboldened by these cases, prosecutors are more likely to pursue businesses, lobbyists and individuals who operate in our complicated political world.    On February 12, 2014, a federal jury convicted former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin on 20 of 21 counts contained in a federal corruption indictment.  Included among the charges on which Nagin was found guilty were nine (9) counts of Honest Services Wire Fraud.  Nagin was indicted…

READ MORE
0 0

25 Mar 2014 My Partner Left Me for the Government! DOJ’s First Opinion Procedure Release of 2014 Approves Buyout of Minority Shareholder-Turned-Government Official

On March 17, 2014, the Department of Justice issued FCPA Opinion Procedure Release 14-01, in which it approved a U.S. issuer’s buyout of a minority partner-turned-government-official’s interest in a foreign company.  In this case, the U.S. issuer was the majority shareholder in a foreign financial services company.  The minority shareholder was a foreign businessman.  The issuer and businessman had a contract that governed the procedure for the issuer’s buyout of the businessman’s interests in the event the businessman was appointed to a foreign government position.  The business ultimately did take a position with the foreign jurisdiction’s central monetary and banking agency, which was a long-time client of the issuer.  The issuer paid the businessman his bonus, severance, and benefits per the parties’ contract, but ran…

READ MORE
0 0

20 Mar 2014 D.C. District Court Order Provides a Warning About Attorney-Client Privilege Protection for Internal Investigations

By Anne DePrez |   A decision earlier this month out of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia serves as a warning that the mere involvement of in-house counsel may not be enough to give attorney-client privilege protection to an internal investigation. In United States ex rel. Barko v. Halliburton Co., Cause No. 05-01276 (D.D.C. Mar. 6, 2014), defense contractor Kellogg, Brown and Root, Inc. (“KBR”) was ordered to produce materials from internal investigations conducted pursuant to its Code of Business Conduct (“COBC”). Because those investigations were conducted to comply with “regulatory law and corporate policy,” the court reasoned, the materials are not privileged.   Barko is a qui tam action brought by a former employee of KBR who alleged that…

READ MORE