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Government Enforcement Exposed - "The GEE"
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23 Jan 2018 First-Time Supreme Court Advocate Appointed to Argue the SEC’s Case in Lucia

  To follow-up on our previous post, on January 18, the Supreme Court appointed Anton Metlitsky of O’Melveny & Myers to argue on behalf of the SEC in Lucia after the Solicitor General abandoned its defense of the SEC’s position in its response to Lucia’s petition for certiorari. This will be Metlitsky’s first argument before the Supreme Court.   According to the National Law Journal, Supreme Court tradition dictates that the Circuit Justice for the circuit that decided the case – here, the D.C. Circuit – picks one of his or her former clerks in these situations. Chief Justice Roberts (Circuit Justice for the D.C. Circuit) selected Metlitsky, one of his former clerks. The article also stated that, according to tradition, the appointment goes to…

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17 Jan 2018 Trace Schmeltz – About the Author

Trace Schmeltz is the founding editor and a regular contributor to the GEE Blog.  As a trial lawyer and student of the capital markets, Trace tries complex financial and corporate cases and counsels his clients in the financial industry and elsewhere as to how to avoid legal and regulatory issues.  Trace has tried securities, mergers and acquisitions (M&A), corporate governance, and complex commercial cases, as well as white collar criminal cases. Throughout the course of his career, he has represented corporations, boards of directors, individual officers, hedge funds and hedge fund managers, investment banks, banks, futures commission merchants, broker-dealers, investment advisers, commodity trading advisors and commodity pool operators.     His practice includes representing individuals and corporations in regulatory actions and investigations under the securities…

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16 Jan 2018 SEC’s Appointments Clause Dilemma Gets Worse

  On January 12, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in SEC v. Lucia, which will decide whether the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) administrative law judges (ALJs) are appointed consistently with the Constitution’s Appointments Clause. Unfortunately for the SEC, at least right now, no one is arguing that the SEC’s process is constitutional. What the Court does in this case will potentially upend not only the SEC’s ALJ process but other agencies’ as well.   As this blog has explained here and here, there is a clear circuit split on whether the way that the SEC hires its ALJs comports with the Appointments Clause. The Appointments Clause provides:   [The President] shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall…

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02 Jan 2018 Supreme Court Addresses Cell Phone Privacy in Carpenter v. United States

  On November 29, 2017, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of Timothy Carpenter v. United States.  During argument, a majority of the justices appeared ready to place new limits on the ability of investigators to track the location of cell phone users.   Carpenter was convicted of masterminding a series of armed robberies (ironically, stealing new smart phones) in Ohio and Michigan.  Officials investigating the case sought records from cell phone providers for 16 different phone numbers, including Carpenter’s.  In so doing, they relied upon the Stored Communication Act (18 U.S.C. 2703).  This 1986 law allows phone companies to disclose records when the government can establish “specific and articulate facts showing that there are reasonable grounds to believe” the…

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