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Government Enforcement Exposed - "The GEE"
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24 Nov 2015 DOJ Fraud Section Retains New Compliance Counsel

The Department of Justice (DOJ) Fraud Section recently retained Hui Chen as a full-time compliance expert reporting to the chief of the Fraud Section and the acting chief of the Strategy, Policy, and Training Unit in the Fraud Section. Formerly a federal prosecutor, Ms. Chen most recently served as global head for Anti-Bribery and Corruption at Standard Chartered Bank (SCB). Ms. Chen’s vita also includes her time as assistant general counsel in the Compliance Division of Pfizer, Inc., as well as significant in-house and compliance positions at Microsoft Corporation, to include Director of Legal Compliance for the Greater China Area.   Beginning Nov. 3, Ms. Chen “will provide expert guidance to Fraud Section prosecutors as they consider the enumerated factors in the United States Attorneys’…

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23 Nov 2015 Federal Prisoner Release: The First Step of a More Ambitious Plan

The Federal Bureau of Prisons has caused quite a stir recently due to its anticipated early release of an approximately 6,000 prisoners convicted of drug possession and/or drug trafficking crimes. Much of the debate between opponents and advocates of the mass release has focused on its impact on public safety. Yet, many of its critics are completely unaware of the fact that these events were set in motion more than a year ago, when the U.S. Sentencing Commission unanimously voted to amend the federal sentencing guidelines with respect to drug offenses. What may be even more troubling to critics of the Bureau and Commission’s actions is that this is likely only the first step toward a more ambitious reform – the elimination of mandatory minimum…

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16 Nov 2015 SEC Reduces Dodd-Frank Whistleblower Award for “Unreasonable Delay,” Announces Policy of “More Heavily” Punishing Delay After Award Program’s Implementation

Continuing our coverage of the SEC’s whistleblower award program, the SEC recently announced a notable award order. What is notable about this award is not the size of the bounty, but the fact the SEC reduced the award for “unreasonable delay” in reporting, stating for the first time that “the award could have been higher had this whistleblower not hesitated.”   As we have previously discussed, the Dodd-Frank Act’s whistleblower award program permits the SEC to award whistleblowers a bounty between 10 percent and 30 percent of an enforcement sanction. While this is not the first time the SEC reduced an award due to a claimant’s delay, the SEC had mitigated its prior reductions by noting the delays pre-dated the Dodd-Frank Act. Here, in contrast,…

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06 Nov 2015 Protected Activity and Individual Liability: Broadened Interpretations of the False Claims Act Anti-Retaliation Provision

The False Claims Act’s (FCA) anti-retaliation provision allows private whistleblowers to file an FCA complaint without retaliation from their employers. A series of 2015 decisions interpreting the recent amendments to the FCA indicate that courts have increasingly broadened their view as to which types of activities are protected under the anti-retaliation provisions and whom they may be brought against. The expansion of protected activities and persons covered requires corporate entities to be aware of the inevitable increase in anti-retaliation actions due to the broadened scope of the FCA’s whistleblower protections.   Prior to 2009, the anti-retaliation provisions protected only those acts done in furtherance of an FCA qui tam action. Protected activity included only that which provided an employer notice of possible litigation. The passage…

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05 Nov 2015 “Hide No Harm Act Of 2015” Targets Employers, Directors and Officers

The 114th Congress has now taken up the policy recently announced by the Department of Justice (DOJ) through the Yates Memo. The Hide No Harm Act (S.2140) would impose criminal penalties upon corporate officers who fail to advise an appropriate federal agency of “serious danger associated with a product, service or business practice.” Corporate officers who fail to notify an appropriate agency of the federal government regarding any serious danger associated with a covered product, service or business practice within twenty-four hours of the individual receiving notice of such dangers could be punished by a fine and imprisonment for up to five (5) years. A fine imposed upon an individual for violating the Act “may not be paid, directly or indirectly, out of the assets…

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